Ancient Egyptian Medicine

Tue 27th

16:00 - 16:20

Medicine in Ancient Egypt is without a doubt one of the most fascinating aspects of the culture that flourished thousands of years ago on the Nile Valley. Extremely advanced and well-respected for its time, it would go on to influence both Greek and Roman medicine and would not be surpassed for centuries in its skills and techniques. I believe my research is relevant because it explores a field that is not often discussed, but is highly useful for our general knowledge and our understanding of the evolution of medicine over time. The paper is written in a style accessible for all types of audiences, with a good balance of general and specialist observations and definitions of unknown terms provided where necessary. While not attempting to be exhaustive, it will cover a few key areas in the field, including surgical practices, the status of doctors and the use of natural remedies.

Paul Matei Christian Botez

School of Modern Languages and Cultures

College of Arts

My Name is Paul Botez (although in real life I mostly use Matei) and I am a fourth-year Comparative Literature and French student at the University of Glasgow. I am originally from Romania and I have also lived in Strasbourg, France for almost a year as part of my Erasmus exchange. Although the topic of Ancient Egyptian medicine has little to do with my area of study, I have actually been interested in medicine and its history for many years; the complexities of the human body have never ceased to amaze me and I believe that by studying how different conceptions of anatomy and physiology have evolved over time, one can observe the progress of an entire civilization. I have chosen this period in particular because of our collective fascination with the Ancient Egypt; nowadays depicted in various forms of media, this millennia-old civilization found itself at the forefront of innovation in all fields - from sciences to architecture and literature. Hopefully, my paper will be able to illuminate certain aspects about this great culture, to some extent still shrouded in mystery and exoticism.